Fractals are complex geometric patterns that repeat themselves at every scale. Trees and ferns are fractal in nature. The branch from a tree or a frond from a fern is a miniature replica of the whole: not identical, but similar in nature. Man has always found fractals beautiful without realizing why. Why are clouds and mountains beautiful? Trees? Flowers? Snowflakes? I believe it is because of their fractal geometry. If you google “fractals found in nature”, you will see objects that I have photographed throughout my whole life. One natural fractal I had never photographed, however, were “Brownian Curves”, and although most people would say this series are simply photographs of smoke, the mathematics behind them are truly beautiful.

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After viewing Enrique’ series of smoke images, the complex and fractal inspired works led me to shoot more off my own smoke images with the intention of montaging them into my final video. the next gallery is a display of a small number of my smoke images. In the capture of these images i created a small studio environment, using lighting and background to achieve the best results. The smoke was created using incense  sticks. When photographing a small number of the smoke images, i places coloured acetate in front of the lighting set ups to create colour casts over the smoke.

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A second series of image by Enrique has caught my attention also. “Connected” is a series of 22 images that portray the intertwined nature of life. Gravity is an invisible glue that binds all the objects in the space-time continuum that we inhabit. If we could see that invisible glue, it might look like these images. Yet, gravity is not the only force that creates bonds between us. “Does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?”

In the world of networking websites, such as Facebook, 6 degrees of separation is no longer a theoretical principle. The man next to you on a bus is not a complete stranger. Similarly, every vertex in a network of bubbles is connected to every other intersection. Some times the path is very apparent, but often it is not. Yet, the connections remain. And like people, every node is unique. But put together, a larger entity appears. this series of images leads my consistently back  to the thoughts of; In a universe where everything is connected, should we be surprised by coincidences?

The subject matter depicted in these images is no coincidence either: soap bubbles. The dual hydrophilic (‘water-loving’) and hydrophobic (‘water-hating’) nature of soap allows it to modify the surface behavior of the water in which it is dissolved, and thus create bubbles. But it also links substances that otherwise would not mix, like oil and water. In every day life we use this property to wash our hands clean. But life itself could not exist without the connections that these molecules make. The walls and membranes of plant and animal cells are covered in soap-like molecules that allow them to network with each other and interact with the world around them, and to create larger, multicellular organisms like the fruits and vegetables that form the backgrounds of every image in this series. In using these concepts and techniques, Enrique subtly, even if unintentionally relates his work to fractal geometry.

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